Branding lesson from Super Bowl

What do Super Bowl ads and spam have in common? In both cases, they are about scale, about disruption and hope. We just need to approach enough people then those who are approached will buy goods and we will get profit.

This is just the hope that customers who hear about you or know you through 30-second commercials don’t automatically become equivalent sales. Specifically, when the brand logo appears about 10 seconds at the end of the ad enough for viewers to “run away”. And if you spend most of the year budget to invest in such activities, you will not have or very little budget to follow.

This is just the hope that customers who hear about you or know you through 30-second commercials don’t automatically become equivalent sales. Specifically, when the brand logo appears about 10 seconds at the end of the ad enough for viewers to “run away”. And if you spend most of the year budget to invest in such activities, you will not have or very little budget to follow.

The American National Football League’s Super Bowl championship is a feat of opportunity, reputation and scale. Between the press releases and the tabloid news, the Super Bowl ad is simply equivalent to more than 110 million viewers. Or you can see the brand through the mouths of chewing potatoes and the distance to the bathroom.

There must be better ways to spend $ 4 million in marketing budgets, but certainly, there are not many more outstanding ways. That is the key. That’s what big brands are willing to spend: attention density.

If Super Bowl is truly an accredited success, there is an important lesson for those who are planning to fund this program. Bragging rights. The real lesson of Super Bowl is not whether advertising is worthwhile or how it affects your reputation.

The lesson of America’s biggest tournament is that with many advertisers, the ability to declare “we are here” still has greater strength “this is what we can get from being here”. And for businesses that have been in the Super Bowl before, particularly long ago, presence is an expectation.

Super Bowl is a private advertising agency that everyone is a flight trainer. And the idea is that part of the big playground is always extremely attractive.But if you are not at the break between the Super Bowl on Sunday, there are other lessons.

If you know what the Super Bowl tells you about the desire of people to be involved in something respected by others, how would you change the proposal for leadership you are preparing? How will you apply lessons from Sunday? What will you do for leaders to understand how well you are applying for money?